Test

Following Young Fathers

Following Young Father Further builds on a baseline study called Following Young Fathers.

Following Young Fathers was designed to explore the dynamics of young fatherhood over time.

The broad aim of the Following Young Fathers study was to trace the changing lives, experiences, relationships, and support needs of young fathers; to draw out their lived experiences of the transition into parenthood, and the causes and consequences of a major and generally unplanned transition in their lives; and to explore their life histories and the wider historical/structural processes that shape their roles and identities.

A total of 31 young fathers comprised the overall longitudinal sample for this study, 11 of whom we have followed up in the Following Young Fathers Further study.

Findings from Following Young Fathers are reported in briefing paper series, publications in themed sections of two journals guest edited by the original research team, and selected journal articles, book chapter web resources and team presentations.

The briefing paper series is available open access and is a valuable set of resources for researchers and practitioners alike. These cover key themes of relevance to policy and practice, including:

  • Young fathers' transitions into fatherhood,
  • Young fathers' relationships with the mothers of their children,
  • The significance of grandparent support,
  • Trajectories through education, employment and training,
  • Experiences of young fathers involved with the criminal justice system, and,
  • Their housing needs and trajectories,

A full write up of the study is soon to be published in book format with Policy Press. This will be co-authored by Following Young Fathers Director Bren Neale and our study Director Anna Tarrant.

Watch this space for further details when we have them!

In the meantime, you can learn more about the studies comprising the Following Young Fathers research programme from Emerita Professor Bren Neale and Following Young Fathers Further Director, Professor Anna Tarrant.

Supporting Young Fathers community stamp

Supporting Young Fathers

You might have spotted our community stamp dotted around the website. This stamp has been created to represent our diverse and vibrant community of young fathers, professionals, researchers, and advocates. We share a vision of creating a more supportive environment for young fathers and their families.

Supporting Young Fathers community stamp

Supporting Young Fathers

You might have spotted our community stamp dotted around the website. This stamp has been created to represent our diverse and vibrant community of young fathers, professionals, researchers, and advocates. We share a vision of creating a more supportive environment for young fathers and their families.

From our partners and young dads

[Speaking about support of young fathers] We’ve done a lot of kind of advocation and representing them, a lot of the time there’s involvement with statutory services. They don’t have the care of the young person, the care’s provided by the state or the mother, so we’ve attended lots of meetings with the young person to offer additional support and facilitated contact where necessary and offered just general emotional wellbeing, support, improving robustness and resilience, encouraging them to have as amicable relationship as possible.

avatar
Housing Charity

And I suppose it goes back to what we were saying before about behaviours, maybe the education side of stuff and the fact that men aren’t involved in those early conversations, you know, whether it is, I know they’re invited to come along to bumps to babies but I don’t know whether we go into the detail around some of that brain development side of stuff and things like that. Maybe that is the thing that really would change things. You know, if you were given all of that information about what happens to a child as they grow, in a scientific way, as easy to understand as possible, could be the thing that impacted on behaviour in the home.

avatar
Children's Charity

I think both a mother and father combined, it’s communicating and both being on the same page of what’s best for your child or children, and for both, it’s just being there 100% for them and not, like, putting yourself first, it’s, you know, putting the child’s interests first...

avatar
Jock, 33
I was 23 when I had my child

We need to be including, we need to not [just] be focusing on mum and child […] That’s a great focus but dad … dad’s not invisible, dad needs to be in the picture as well because there’s research that shows you the effect it has on children and families as a whole when dad isn’t in the picture, so services need to be changing the way in which they work so it’s more inclusive.

avatar
Children and Families Support Organisation

Cause I think a lot of the time, some of young people who end up having children have been through the care system or support systems and they can feel quite judged or labelled by organisations and it’s breaking the cycle and breaking them out of that to feel empowered to be able to take stuff back, that’s the real interest to me. So, it’s about getting support right, as in being there and giving advice and guidance and all them things that we can do, but also making sure that we are doing with people as opposed to people.

avatar
Children's Charity

One of the most successful projects we ever did was an informal dads’ group, and it used to be on Saturdays […] they did what they wanted, they used to do things like breakfast, and they would have breakfast together and talk about dad stuff and where they were taking their kids. And that group was always really well attended because there was never an agenda. They were never judged. They were just there together.

avatar
Children and Families Support Organisation

...the whole stay at home dad thing is not something to be ashamed of, you know, if you’re a dad and you wanna take your daughter out for the day, or you wanna take your kid out for the day on your own, well why is that frowned upon, why can’t you take your child out for the day

avatar
Toby, 26
I was 24 when I had my first child.

Oh…patience…compassion…tolerance, a whole boatload a’ that!  Honestly, I like a whole lot of life.  Sacrifice…compromise, yeah I think, yeah I think they, they would be the, the big, the five, I feel, I think that was five, they would be the main. 

avatar
Ben, 31
I was 20 when I had my child

We’re currently in touch with social services for two [dads] because they don’t understand why they can’t see their children because they haven’t been informed by social services, their partner. So there’s a massive communication breakdown with those young men, so that’s the main focus of what we’re dealing with at the minute.

avatar
Young Fathers' Support Organisation

Partners

North East Young Dads and Lads LogoCoram Family and Child Care LogoYMCA Humber LogoTogether for Childhood LogoSwedish Researchers Logo

Stay up to date

Add your email to our newsletter
Your details are safe with us. We will never share them with anyone else, and it’s easy to opt-out at any time. Check out our privacy policy here.